Friday, May 24, 2013

Bookwormism: On my Radar

If there’s anything that I’m sure about my book lists right now, it’s that my tower of waiting un-reads has no power to stop me from updating my to-read roster. With that said, here are a handful of books, a mix of light and heavy, that I’m adding to the list:
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Slaughterhouse Five
by Kurt Vonnegut

DutyDancewithDeath
From Goodreads:
“Also called The Children's Crusade: A Duty-Dance with Death (1969), Kurt Vonnegut's absurdist classic Slaughterhouse Five introduces us to Billy Pilgrim, a man who becomes unstuck in time after he is abducted by aliens from the planet Tralfamadore.
In a plot-scrambling display of virtuosity, we follow Pilgrim simultaneously through all phases of his life, concentrating on his (and Vonnegut's) shattering experience as an American prisoner of war who witnesses the firebombing of Dresden.
Don't let the ease of reading fool you—Vonnegut's isn't a conventional, or simple, novel. He writes, "There are almost no characters in this story, and almost no dramatic confrontations, because most of the people in it are so sick, and so much the listless playthings of enormous forces. One of the main effects of war, after all, is that people are discouraged from being characters."



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Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe
by Benjamin Alire Sáenz

AristotleandDante
From Goodreads:
“Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe is a lyrical novel about family and friendship.  It is a coming-of-age book about two awkward Mexican teenage boys growing up in the 1980s. Aristotle is an angry teen with a brother in prison. Dante is a know-it-all who has an unusual way of looking at the world. When the two meet at the swimming pool, they seem to have nothing in common.
But as the loners start spending time together, they discover that they share a special friendship—the kind that changes lives and lasts a lifetime. And it is through this friendship that Ari and Dante will learn the most important truths about themselves and the kind of people they want to be.”
 
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The Virgin Suicides
by Jeffrey EugenidesVirgin Suicides

From Goodreads:
“The haunting, humorous and tender story of the brief lives of the five entrancing Lisbon  sisters, The Virgin Suicides, now a major film, is Jeffrey Eugenides' classic debut novel.

The shocking thing about the girls was how nearly normal they seemed when their mother let them out for the one and only date of their lives. Twenty years on, their enigmatic personalities are embalmed in the memories of the boys who worshipped them and who now recall their shared adolescence: the brassiere draped over a crucifix belonging to the promiscuous Lux; the sisters' breathtaking appearance on the night of the dance; and the sultry, sleepy street across which they watched a family disintegrate and fragile lives disappear.”

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Eleanor & Park
by Rainbow RowellEleanorandPark

From Goodreads:
“"Bono met his wife in high school," Park says.
"So did Jerry Lee Lewis," Eleanor answers.
"I’m not kidding," he says.
"You should be," she says, "we’re sixteen."
"What about Romeo and Juliet?"
"Shallow, confused, then dead."
''I love you," Park says.
"Wherefore art thou," Eleanor answers.
"I’m not kidding," he says.
"You should be."
Set over the course of one school year in 1986, ELEANOR AND PARK is the story of two star-crossed misfits—smart enough to know that first love almost never lasts, but brave and desperate enough to try. When Eleanor meets Park, you’ll remember your own first love—and just how hard it pulled you under.”

4 comments:

  1. I have read The Virgin Suicides and it's good - the atmosphere and the characterizations more than anything else.

    I haven't read either Eleanor & Park or Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe but their covers are so beautiful I could have them on my walls.

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    1. Many people are saying that to me too about The Virgin Suicides! I feel so left out when my bookworm friends talk about it, haha. Seems like I really am missing a good book in my shelf. I'll pick it up as soon as I can. :)

      Re E&P and Aristotle & Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe--I totally agree with you! It's their cover arts that actually snagged my attention first, then I read the synopses and decided I want to read them. :D

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  2. New follower here. I stumbled across your blog through a goodreads thread!


    I look forward to your future posts and hope i can get some great suggestions from your list of reviews.Hope i can see you back at either one of my blogs.

    twinjabookreviews.blogspot.com

    yamulticulturaljunkie.wordpress.com

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    1. Thanks, I've followed your reviews blog! I'm hoping the same from you, thank you. :)

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